Friday, August 12, 2011

My Take 100 Pages In: The Big Short

First a couple of caveats.  I teach in South Dakota so I usually wait for a book to come out in paperback before buying it; therefore, I will frequently comment on books long after everyone else.  Second, I have a too large to be read pile.  It may eventually allow me to be profiled on Hoarders, so I will frequently comment about books long after everyone else. (Sound kicks in quickly, so those of you at work should turn down the sound before clicking.)

So far, Michael Lewis's The Big Short has left three powerful impressions.

First, some of the key players seemed to have been characters who will eventually appear on Alphas. (Sound kicks in quickly, so those of you at work should turn down the sound before clicking.) 

The two most notable talented but flawed mutants are Michael Burry and Greg Lippmann.  Burry is a socially awkward, obsessive, man with a glass eye. Lippmann seemingly was created by "a team of experts" to "terrify a Wall Street Customer."  He speaks too quickly and is "incapable of disguising himself or his motives."

Second, far too many people seem to have seen the catastrophe approach; they all chose to profit from it rather than prevent it.

Third, the people at AIG and Standard & Poor's come off as comically inept.

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